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WEBSITES FOR ENGLISH PRACTICE

It's important to practise English as often as possible. Below are links to free websites with many activities to improve listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.

All Skills

Click on the link, then use the menu at the top for Courses, Grammar, Pronunciation, Vocabulary, News, and other activities. A good website for British English.

Click on the link, then use the menu at the top for Test Your English, Beginning Level, Intermediate Level, Advanced Level, and US History. A good website for American English.

Click on the link, then scroll down for Learn English, Articles, Video Courses, and Listening activities. A good website for Australian English.

Listening

Click on the link, then use the Listening Activities menu. There are 3 levels of listening quizzes: Easy, Intermediate or Difficult. A good website for American English.

News

Click on the link, then choose a lesson from level 0 (easy) to level 7 (difficult). Use the links on the right to find more lessons. The lessons are based on news stories.

Reading

Click on the link and use the Reading menu for texts about US history, people or places. You can listen to the audio and read the story. This website is good for American English.

Click on the link to see short stories by famous American writers. You can listen to the audio and read the story. This website is good for American English.

Click on the link, then scroll down to see articles about a range of topics. The level is intermediate or upper-intermediate. This website is good for British English.

Videos

Click on the link, then scroll down to see the video activities. The level is upper-intermediate or advanced. This website is good for British English.

Vocabulary

Click on the link for an online English-English dictionary. Has simple definitions and example sentences. You can listen to audio to check the pronunciation of many words.

 

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“When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean – neither more nor less.”
(Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking Glass)

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